Who Are You? – Authenticity

Posted on: June 15th, 2011 by latentresources No Comments

Who are you? I don’t mean, “What do you do?” or “Where did you graduate college?”, but who are you on the inside? Is what you see in the mirror a true reflection of who you are?   Do you have to hide a history inked onto your skin? What about that driving record? Do you present yourself, as if an actor, to your family, to your new date, to your boss, to your church group?  One inescapable truth is that we can not hide from ourselves. What if you could be so genuine that who you are in private is who you want to be in public? Would it concern you if someone looked through your computer, in your closet, or at your credit card receipts? The disconnect between the real ‘you’ and the ‘you’ that you wear on the outside, is a lie; a false front. It’s a mask one wears to hide the truth, like a bad toupe.

Take for example; you are gingerly walking back from the break room with a HOT cup of coffee, when a co-worker abruptly steps in front of you. You end up with your shirt tainted a dirty brown, and the skin on your chest is left feeling like you exfoliated it with 60-grit sandpaper. What is your immediate response? What is the first word out of your mouth?

Whatever you express in that moment shows the viewers your true composure on the inside. If you are characterized by patience, a mild response will be initiated. If short-tempered, foul language and rage may flow. Or, maybe you have just enough self-control to hold back the words, but your facial expression says it all. You may even be able to lie well enough with smiles and “That’s OK”s, but inside you are steaming for days.

The Proverbs of The Bible says, “As a man thinks in his heart, so is he”. The question remains: “Who are you?” While you can’t erase your past, a new future can certainly be carved out. The reason many people shy away from authenticity is because it requires brutal honesty, confrontation, hurt feelings, exposing the past, dealing with it, and apologizing; first with yourself, then with others.  Not only that, it’s a life-style of sacrificing what’s fun for what’s right; what is simply OK for what’s best. Surprisingly, once you’ve dealt with yourself, facing others is more of a relief than a burden.

If you could live without the fear of someone digging up some of your old bones, or you making a slip of the tongue at the wrong time, would you go to work on your self and begin eliminating the things that could come back to haunt you?

Here is a short list of things you may need to work on:

- White lies
- Badly broken relationships
- Peeking at those websites
- Credit scores
- Unscrupulous language
- Broken promises
- Untamed tempers
- Dietary control

The good news is that you are re-programmable. Research has shown that it takes, on average, 21 consciously repeated efforts to replace an old habit with a new, good habit. With consistency and patience, you can become the person you want to be, starting on the inside. You will be authentic, not worried about the thoughts of others, not second-guessing your words. You will have confidence and fulfillment by conquering yourself and bringing your thoughts and actions into line with who you ultimately want to be. Becoming this will serve you more than you can calculate, and prepare you for positions of greater responsibility.